Secrets to Success: how charities can maximise the impact of broadcast PR

Secrets to Success: how charities can maximise the impact of broadcast PR


The opportunities for charities to build a direct, emotional connection with audiences through TV and radio are unparalleled. But competition for airtime is fierce and maximising the impact of campaigns to deliver tangible impact is both a science and an art.

For this broadcast PR event, BBC veteran Jack Baine is joined by two industry experts who share the perspectives of an in-house communicator and a TV correspondent.

Jim Reed, Health reporter, BBC News offers his perspective on how charities can work best with the editorial channels to shape engaging content.

Kate Jones, Director of Communications at Macmillan Cancer Support shares her view son how to achieve excellence in end-to end broadcast planning, from creating engaging stories, to amplifying broadcast work across multiple channels including owned, paid and social.

Speakers:
Jim Reed, Health Reporter, BBC News
Kate Jones, Director of Communications at Macmillan Cancer Support
Jack Baine, Head of Broadcast, Good Broadcast

This is the latest in our series of virtual ‘Good Broadcast Delivers’ events. Our aim is to create a virtual space to discuss smart thinking and debate best practice in these challenging times and most importantly, feel connected.

This event has passed. To join our events guestlist or for a copy of our previous event recordings, please contact us.
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Why TalkTV will get people talking – and what it means for PR

Why TalkTV will get people talking – and what it means for PR


Jack Baine, Head of Broadcast at Good Broadcast shares his opinion with PR Week on how PRs should embrace the new launch of TalkTV and capitalise on the new opportunities it creates for brands.

Read the full PR Week article below.


The clue is in the name. TalkTV is a televised offshoot of TalkRADIO, which has been broadcasting since 1995, and its mission is to get people talking.

It was already succeeding before its first show began, thanks, in large part, to the Rupert Murdoch-media apparatus it already has installed around it (Murdoch bought TalkRADIO in 2016).

To get people chatting, TalkTV has hired celebrities to front its shows who create controversy. Some go looking for it, to others it comes naturally. Either way, it ensures publicity, good or bad.

Two divisive figures, Piers Morgan and Donald Trump, helped launch the channel last night. Famous faces including Jeremy Kyle and Sharon Osborne will grace the its initial output. They join others in an ensemble cast drawn together for their talent as walking talking points.

Morgan has taken headline billing. Reviled and enjoyed in varying measures, he is a big signing for the nascent channel. You don’t have to warm to him to know he has a command of how the mechanics of PR and the media grind together to power the engine of publicity.

His PR is not flawless, but he won over plenty of one-time haters during the pandemic by refusing to kowtow to amateurish attempts by MPs to swerve crucial questions over the impact of COVID-19 – a daily performance that had viewers cheering him on through a mouthful of Frosties. Some of his savagings were brutal. In the process he propelled GMB to the number one breakfast TV show in the UK (the day before he walked off the show in a huff after a row with the weatherman over Meghan Markle).

So, what to expect from TalkTV? If the launch of its closest competition, GBNews, is anything to go by, the big talking points will not be about its content, but the programming and production. GBNews had a big hitter of its own in Andrew Neil, last seen wandering away shaking his head.

TalkTV launched last night and Murdoch, 91, who is probably enjoying one last roll of the media dice, has demonstrably not allowed money to stand in the way of the channel’s image. The opening shows had solid production values – compared to GBNews it looked lavish.

Certainly Murdoch’s media empire has been trailing the launch with front-page splashes a PR would kill for. The front page of The Sun this week carried ‘news’ of Trump’s thoughts on the Duke and Duchess of Sussex directly lifted from the launch interview before it aired, like an internal news cycle going in reverse.

The interview last night did generate some talking points, but Trump vs Morgan is not Frost vs Nixon. The good news for PRs invested in newsjacking is that it doesn’t matter. The channel is not about news, but divisive opinion from big names recycled into news. That’s good news for PR.

“With the advent of TalkTV, and other more ‘opinion-led’ news outlets in recent years, the broadcast media landscape is changing, and it needs to be embraced, not dismissed or ignored because it feels different,” says Jack Baine, head of broadcast at Good Broadcast (part of Good Relations), who spent 21 years at the BBC.

“TalkTV, and the like, are bound to divide opinion among viewers. Some will love the outspoken nature of it all, others will loathe it, but PRs should be thinking of ‘opportunity’.

The broadcast media landscape is changing, and it needs to be embraced, not dismissed or ignored because it feels different

“If a story or campaign is thought about carefully, and it has the right angle for the right show and the right presenter, then it can fly.

“On TV and radio, PR is all about creating stimulating debate with punchy, controversial or even fun talking points, so why not lean into these new outlets?”

On last night’s showing Morgan fans can expect GMB-style rants about wokery, cancel culture and anything else that inflames the passions of this self-styled ‘frustrated liberal’, although without the balance provided by former breakfast show co-host Susanna Reid, whose inherent journalistic sense of balance reined in his wilder frequent excesses.

Some might suggest TalkTV missed out by not signing Reid to reunite the GMB team, which had alchemic chemistry, but perhaps producers feared that might spoil the fun – and the potential for headlines (including those written by outlets outside the Murdoch empire). Certainly the name of the show – Piers Morgan Uncensored – suggests restraint is not on the agenda.

Again, that’s good news for PR. When Morgan wasn’t getting worked up by MPs, minor royals or opinionated students, he memorably took umbrage over Greggs’ launch of a vegan sausage roll. His perplexed annoyance propelled the news everywhere, contributing to spectacular publicity – and sales – for such a humble product.

TalkTV may not enrich the UK’s cultural landscape. Instead we may discover a crop of self-publicists arguing about Katie Price. Murdoch is rumoured to be keen on adding Alan Sugar and Jeremy Clarkson to his stable of presenters, neither of whom has a reputation for keeping their opinions to themselves.

Whatever happens – and bigger media launches than this have flopped – for now it’s likely to afford opportunities for PR to take advantage of.


Hope After Stroke, Stroke Association

Raising awareness of #HopeAfterStroke for Stroke Association

Working with the Stroke Association, we delivered the charity’s most successful PR campaign ever, proving the difference ‘hope’ can make to a survivor’s recovery.

Good Broadcast were challenged to raise awareness and increase engagement of Stroke Association’s ‘Hope After Stroke’ campaign – a fundraising campaign designed to demonstrate how donations can give hope to survivors after a stroke.

To bring to life the devastating impacts that strokes can have on people’s lives, and establish the difference ‘hope’ can make to a survivor’s recovery, we set out to provide media with tangible statistics on the knock-on effects that many stroke survivors experience.

Working closely with the charity, we commissioned a unique piece of research amongst the Stroke Association’s database of stroke survivors – which offered us a level of insight that no other data could, while also eradicating any third party research costs.

This research provided impactful figures relating to the measurable impact of a stroke on survivors’ employment, relationships and accommodation, which enabled us to capture mass media attention. But critically, it also allowed us to convey the fundraising messaging around the ‘power of hope’ in stroke recovery.

We focused on national broadcast slots and key regional outlets, securing 161 pieces of coverage including Sky News, ITV, BBC Radio 2 and Times Radio, with 100% of the coverage featuring a Stroke Association spokesperson and carrying key campaign messages.

It was the charity’s most successful PR campaign ever delivering over 430 pieces of media coverage with 86% key message penetration, the highest web traffic the charity has ever seen, translating to nearly 100,000 additional visitors to the donations page, and crucially, securing £364,295 in donations, making a valuable difference to many stroke survivors’ lives. Furthermore, consumer tracking showed that ‘concern regarding strokes’ amongst the public increased by 6% over the campaign period, despite Covid-19 dominating public consciousness.


Just Dance 2022 Launch, Ubisoft

Just Dance 2022 Launch

Move over dad-dancing, because mum-dancing is taking over. To celebrate the launch of the new Just Dance 2022 game, we worked with Ubisoft and self-confessed mum dancer Kimberly Wyatt to celebrate the rise of the ‘mum-dance’ and encourage the family to get dancing together in the run up to Christmas.

Thanks to the popularity of dance-related social media trends, 2021 has seen a considerable increase in mums sharing their dance moves and has led to the rise in embracing the mum-dance! What do we mean by the mum-dance? It’s the classic, and often awkward, move that sees people shuffle their feet from side to side combined with some clicking of the fingers – or actually, the mum-dance can be whatever moves your mum wants to throw!

Our research showed that a whopping 73% of mums in the UK confess to being a mum-dancer, with over a third 34% saying they embrace it each time they dance and a fifth (21%) saying they still love to dance despite it making their children hide with embarrassment! The research, which was commissioned by Ubisoft – the publishers of family game ‘Just Dance’, also revealed the go-to mum dancing songs from a list of classic hits. Abba’s ‘Dancing Queen’ topped the list followed by Gloria Gaynor’s ‘I Will Survive’ and Queen’s ‘Don’t Stop Me Now’.

To help spread the word, we teamed up with Pussycat Doll and self-confessed mum dancer Kimberley Wyatt to encourage mums and their families around the UK to pick up a copy of Just Dance 2022 and get everyone dancing together and having fun.
Despite an extremely crowded news agenda, the broadcast outreach drove coverage in 12 high quality BBC regional outlets with a 1.6M audience reach positioning Just Dance 2022 as a fantastic Christmas present for all the family.


Channel 5 News

Good Broadcast Delivers: Channel 5 News


For this session in our series of discussions with high profile broadcasters, we’re delighted to welcome Jess Bulman, Deputy Editor of Channel 5 News for a Q&A with our Head of Broadcast and former BBC editor Jack Baine.

Watch this ‘behind the scenes’ discussion to gain an insight into their Chanel 5’s new hour-long news and features programme, presented by Sian Williams weekdays between 5pm and 6pm, and find out how PRs can secure coverage.

Speakers:
Jess Bulman, Deputy Editor, Channel 5 News
Jack Baine, Head of Broadcast, Good Broadcast

This event has passed. To join our events guestlist or for a copy of our previous event recordings, please contact us.
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Graham & Brown, Superfresco Easy

International Wallpaper Week

Scarlett Moffatt launches limited edition charity wallpaper with Superfresco Easy for International Wallpaper Week.

How many times have you walked into someone’s house, didn’t like the look of what you saw, didn’t say anything about it and just went off them a little bit? If you did, then you’re not alone.

This summer, we were tasked with helping to inspire better mental health, following new research which revealed that 72% of Brits agree that their current home interior is good for their mental health.

The study, which was commissioned for 2021 International Wallpaper Week, also revealed that we’re quick to judge friends, family and new partners on the way they’ve decorated their home, but we stay quiet about it, whilst 75% said the design of their own home was very important, and 63% said it was important to them because it made them feel happier.

To help inspire Brits to create a space that’s not only about personal choice, but also about creating a space that’s good for our mental health, we enrolled the help of TV presenter, home interiors expert and Samaritans charity ambassador Scarlett Moffat to launch a new wallpaper, Superfresco Easy, to inspire happiness and get people to understand the small interior changes that can make a difference Things like bright colours, more light and the reduction of clutter can do wonders for us.

Through an integrated social and broadcast campaign, we made Graham and Brown and Samaritans part of the mental health conversation, resulting in a hugely successful campaign which secured 155 pieces of broadcast coverage in top tier outlets including Stephs Packed Lunch, Sky News Radio and Heart Radio. The campaign also resulted in a total audience reach of 47M, driving mass market awareness of Superfresco Easy wallpaper.


BBC News Channel

Good Broadcast Delivers: BBC News Channel


Twenty four hour news channels have been broadcasting for decades in the UK, and they’re now more important than ever. The news agenda is also busier than ever, so how do brands cut through and successfully target rolling news outlets?

For the next session in our series of discussions with high profile broadcasters, we’re delighted to welcome Martine Croxall, presenter on the BBC News Channel, the most watched news channel in Britain, for a Q&A with our Head of Broadcast and former BBC editor Jack Baine.

We hope you can join us for a ‘behind the scenes’ discussion to explore what’s shaping their news agenda and how PR professionals can work best with the channel’s producers to craft compelling stories.

Speakers:
Martine Croxall, Presenter, BBC News Channel
Jack Baine, Head of Broadcast, Good Broadcast

This event has passed. To join our events guestlist or for a copy of our previous event recordings, please contact us.
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Swim England, Learn to Swim

Learn to Swim

New research by Swim England, the governing body for swimming in England, found that the average child stops having swimming lessons at seven and a half years old, meaning 3.4 million youngsters are stopping lessons too early – a figure which has risen during the coronavirus pandemic.

That is in stark comparison to the 3.4 million youngsters who are stopping lessons too early – a figure which has risen during the coronavirus pandemic. They include being able to swim at least 100 metres without stopping, treading water for at least 30 seconds, experience swimming in clothing and being able to ‘float to live’ (performing a star float on their back for at least 30 seconds).The research also looked into how much time parents spend with their children in the pool. Nearly three-quarters (72%) said they hadn’t been swimming with their children in the last month or even longer.

To highlight the startling fact that so many youngsters are failing to meet swimming competencies post covid, we brought on board two experts in the field, Olympic gold medallist Duncan Goodhew and Jane Nickerson MBE, Swim England Chief Executive, to talk about Swim England’s ‘Learn to Swim’ programme.

The result? Our outreach drove coverage in 140 commercial stations across the UK and in top tier national outlets including Channel 5, BBC London TV, Sky News Radio and GB News. We also conducted interviews with a series of BBC regional outlets including BBC Radio Nottingham, BBC Radio Wiltshire, BBC Radio Somerset and BBC Radio Leicester.

In doing so, we got the nation talking about the importance of not only ensuring kids become competent swimmers, but how they can also enjoy the huge physical and mental health benefits that exercising in the water can bring.


BBC Radio 2’s The Jeremy Vine Show

Good Broadcast Presents: BBC Radio 2’s The Jeremy Vine Show


As we begin to emerge from the third national lockdown this spring, the broadcast news agenda is busier than ever. With businesses and brands jostling for headlines in national radio outlets, understanding how to craft compelling stories for broadcast media has perhaps never been so crucial.

For the next session in our series of discussions with high-profile broadcasters, we’re delighted to welcome Tim Johns, producer and reporter at BBC Radio 2’s The Jeremy Vine Show for a Q&A with our Head of Broadcast and former BBC editor Jack Baine.

We hope you can join us for a ‘behind the scenes’ discussion to explore what’s shaping their news agenda and how PR professionals can work best with the show’s producers to craft compelling stories.

This is the latest in our series of virtual ‘Good Broadcast Delivers’ events. Our aim is to create a virtual space to discuss smart thinking and debate best practice in these challenging times and most importantly, feel connected.

This event has passed. To join our events guestlist or for a copy of our previous event recordings, please contact us.
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South Australia Tourism Commission, After the Bushfires

Australia after the bushfires

Record-breaking temperatures and months of severe drought fuelled a series of massive bushfires across Australia from late 2019 to March 2020. An estimated 1.2bn animals perished and thousands of homes have been destroyed.

But as the fires were slowly put out, Australia faced a whole new issue – a decline in tourism with increasing numbers of holiday-makers cancelling the trips they had planned. This was in part due to the dissemination of photoshopped images on social media showing the entire country going up flames.

Last year tourism contributed more than $47 billion to the Australian economy but this ‘fake news’ was repelling holiday-makers at a time when the economy needed them most.

One particular area that was hit hardest by the fire was the pristine Kangaroo Island in South Australia. Australia’s third largest island, home to koalas, kangaroos and some of the most idyllic beaches Australia has to offer.

We were tasked by the South Australia Tourism Commission to create a ‘bushfire recovery campaign’ to dispel these myths and show the UK holidaymakers that Australia is very much open for business as well as to drive donations for Kangaroo Island Wildlife Park.

We developed a broadcast first strategy to ‘show rather than tell’, providing UK viewers with a direct line to an expert bushcraft spokesperson, emotive interviews with local business owners and myth dispelling footage of stunning beaches.

To set the record straight, we brought on board the UK’s best-known bushcraft and wildlife expert Ray Mears, who is not only an expert voice on bushfires and plant regeneration, but also has an established and authentic connection with the UK audience. Ray spear-headed the campaign on behalf of the South Australian Tourism Commission with a remit to tell people in the UK that Australia is ‘open for business’ and one of the key ways that people can support is to come and visit. Viewers who wanted to show support in other ways were encouraged to make donations to the Kangaroo Island Wildlife Park.

To ensure the story landed emotionally with UK viewers, we interviewed local tour operators and hoteliers whose livelihoods have been directly impacted by the decline in tourism. These locals had seen their homes burned to the ground and had dropped everything to help save others and animals whilst they themselves were facing crisis.

To help change perceptions of South Australia as a scorched wasteland, we chose one of the many pristine beaches that Kangaroo Island has to offer as backdrop for filming. From there we conducted a series of live broadcast interviews with the likes of BBC Breakfast, BBC Radio 5 Live, Sky News and Channel 5 News and also captured exclusive B-Roll footage of the makeshift wildlife hospital for the Press Association.

The result? More than a hundred pieces of global coverage (reaching more than 200 million people), and helped convey the real facts about the bushfires in South Australia following sensationalist reports about the whole country being ablaze.

Our campaign also delivered an increase in donations to the Kangaroo Island Wildlife Park.


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